Topic:

Reimbursement

Latest Headlines

Latest Headlines

Tomosynthesis effective for finding cancer, reducing recall rates for women under 50

Digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) is effective in reducing patient recalls and detecting cancers when compared to digital mammography, but is even more effective when used to screen women under the age of 50, according to a study published in October 13 in the  Journal of the National Cancer Institute.

How appropriate are ACR's appropriateness criteria?

Back in the 1990s the American College of Radiology began a huge project to define the appropriate use of different imaging technologies. This effort--the ACR Appropriateness Criteria--is continually updated and covers all medical procedures, helping healthcare providers conduct the most appropriate medical imaging exam for a patient's clinical condition. Recent research shows us, however, that some work still needs to be done when it comes to the use of appropriateness criteria.   

Study finds imaging appropriateness criteria should be modified, expanded

A review of appropriateness criteria of outpatient abdominal and pelvic CT and MRI exams published in  Academic Radiology  has found that of the exams matched with American College of Radiology appropriateness criteria, a high percentage were appropriate and more likely to lead to significant results than inappropriate studies.

Are physicians overpaid for performing colonoscopies?

Last year the  New York Times  created quite a media storm with an article in which it reported on colonoscopies that ranged in price--depending on the location--from $7,563.56 to $19,438 (including a polyp removal).

Researchers: Colonoscopy reimbursement reductions not the best way to cut health costs

Should efforts to cut down costs associated with colonoscopy include targeting the amount endoscopists should be reimbursed for performing the procedure?

Choosing Wisely for radiology: More than a conversation starter

When the Choosing Wisely campaign was launched in 2012, the stated goal of the initiative was to "spark conversation" about the necessity of certain frequently ordered tests and treatments. Currently, we are seeing evidence that Choosing Wisely recommendations--many of which are related to radiology and medical imaging--are, indeed, having an impact.

Unnecessary imaging: Solving a multibillion-dollar problem

Earlier this month, research company peer60 published a report--as described in FierceMedicalImaging--which calculated that as much as $12 billion is wasted every year on unnecessary imaging. The...

Geography a big factor in radiation therapy costs

Radiation therapy costs depend more on the location where the treatment is being provided and the type of facility that is providing the treatment than on factors relating to the type of patient or disease, according to a study published this month in the  International Journal of Radiation Oncology.

Medicare and LDCT lung cancer screening--evidence mounts for coverage

Last December, when the United States Preventive Services Task Force recommended low-dose CT (LDCT) lung cancer screening for high-risk smokers, it was all but a foregone conclusion that the Medicare Evidence Development & Coverage Advisory Committee (MEDCAC) would follow suit and recommend it to be covered by Medicare. Of course, that narrative took a different turn this past April when MEDCAC voted not to recommend LDCT screening, much to the dismay of lung cancer screening advocates. But now, two recent studies seem have supplied evidence that supports lung cancer screening for Medicare patients.

Lawsuit seeks reversal of CMS amyloid reimbursement policy

A lawsuit has been filed in federal court against the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services in an effort to get it to change its policy regarding Medicare reimbursement for the use of PET beta-amyloid scans to detect Alzheimer's disease.