Latest Commentary

Unnecessary imaging: Solving a multibillion-dollar problem

Earlier this month, research company peer60 published a report--as described in FierceMedicalImaging--which calculated that as much as $12 billion is wasted every year on unnecessary imaging. The...

Medicare and LDCT lung cancer screening--evidence mounts for coverage

Last December, when the United States Preventive Services Task Force recommended low-dose CT (LDCT) lung cancer screening for high-risk smokers, it was all but a foregone conclusion that the Medicare Evidence Development & Coverage Advisory Committee (MEDCAC) would follow suit and recommend it to be covered by Medicare. Of course, that narrative took a different turn this past April when MEDCAC voted not to recommend LDCT screening, much to the dismay of lung cancer screening advocates.

But now, two recent studies seem have supplied evidence that supports lung cancer screening for Medicare patients.

Why CMS should reimburse for secondary imaging interpretations

The comment period for the 2015 Medicare Physician Fee Schedule proposed rule ended last week and radiology and imaging-related organizations expressed their concerns about a number of issues, such as the potential for significant reimbursement reductions in radiation oncology services. One area of particular interest to these organizations has to do with the payment for the secondary interpretation of images.

Virtual colonoscopy coverage: Time to end the short shrift

 If Cologuard can win approval and gain traction on the path to reimbursement, why not virtual colonoscopy (CT colonograpy)?

Cancer screening wonder: Skepticism taking over

The introduction of mammography and colonoscopy back in the 1960s helped introduce an "age of wonder" for cancer screening that correlated with a significant drop in mortality rates, according to Cary Gross, M.D., of Yale Medical School. Conversely, according to Gross, the 21st Century has launched a new age of wonder in the sense that people are now wondering how beneficial cancer screening actually is.

Balancing the risks and rewards of imaging with ionizing radiation

A new report from the Committee on Medical Aspects of Radiation in the Environment in the UK reminds us that efforts are underway to continue to understand and balance the risks and rewards of medical imaging with ionizing radiation.

Should age be a barrier to mammography?

According to Judith A. Malmgren, M.D, affiliate assistant professor at the University of Washington's School of Public Health and Community Medicine in Seattle, the problem with determining the effectiveness in this age group is the paucity of available research; elderly women don't make good candidates for clinical trials.

The critical role of radiologists in medical emergencies

A pair of recent articles in two radiology journals remind us of the critical role radiology plays when it come to mass-casualty emergencies.

Imaging false positives and patient anxiety: There are solutions

One of the issues that has plagued advocates of low dose computed tomography (LDCT) lung cancer screening has been the high number of false positives associated with the screening exam. In fact,...

How can we increase colon cancer screening rates?

This is what we know--colorectal cancer screening works. Despite this, screening rates remain problematic. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, about one in three adults ages 50 to 75, haven't been tested for colorectal cancer as recommended by the United States Preventive Services Task Force.